Creepy quote of the day


What happens when intelligence agencies go to war with each other and don’t tell the rest of us? I think there’s something going on between the US and Russia that the public is just seeing pieces of. We have no idea why, or where it will go next, and can only speculate.

Who is Publishing NSA and CIA Secrets, and Why? https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/05/who_is_publishi.html

Oh, Roundup! 

The city of Petaluma in California recently stopped using roundup in parks and school grounds. The result was a 1700% increase in cost of weed control, and a new requirement for operators to wear respirators (unnecessary with roundup which is less toxic than vinegar) while spraying with the far more toxic organic alternatives.

Matt Ridley

http://www.rationaloptimist.com/blog/roundup-or-glyphosate/

How stupid people compensate for bad decisions

…. while remaining stupid.

http://johnhcochrane.blogspot.com/2016/06/transport-innovation.html

http://johnhcochrane.blogspot.com/2016/06/transport-innovation.html

Behold, the VW Trailer!

TRANSPORT INNOVATION

So… the VW trailer. When in need, he puts the trailer in 4th gear, and turns on its electric system. The throttle is stuck full open. He pulls it to get going put, put put put… Then, the trailer pushes the car along. What if he needs to slow down? No problem, he hits the regenerative brakes on the Toyota, so now the VW is also charging up his batteries!

American ingenuity is still alive!

Matt Ridley, against the wind

Matt Ridley published another brilliant commentary on the idioc UK “renewable energy” policies and their huge unintended consequences.

Wind Makes Electricity Expensive and Unreliable Without Cutting Emissions
http://www.rationaloptimist.com/blog/wind-power/

A few of his quotables….

[Policies favoring “Renewable Energy”] has COST wealth, jobs, landscapes, wildlife, security of supply: and all for NOTHING in terms of emissions savings.

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The DECC’s numbers show that small businesses will be paying 77 per cent more per unit for electricity by 2020 than they would be if we were not subsidising renewables.

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The coalition promised secure, affordable and low-carbon power, but instead gave us unreliable, expensive and high-carbon power.

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Why YOU Should Encrypt Everything – a moral obligation

Encryption should be enabled for everything by default, not a feature you turn on only if you’re doing something you consider worth protecting.

This is important. If we only use encryption when we’re working with important data, then encryption signals that data’s importance. If only dissidents use encryption in a country, that country’s authorities have an easy way of identifying them. But if everyone uses it all of the time, encryption ceases to be a signal. No one can distinguish simple chatting from deeply private conversation. The government can’t tell the dissidents from the rest of the population. Every time you use encryption, you’re protecting someone who needs to use it to stay alive.

Why We Encrypt

Please, please, please don’t give me the line, “I have nothing to hide.” Somebody has something good to hide for a very good reason — and that reason may very well be their very lives. By using encryption everywhere, all the time, you protect the weak, the innocent and the vulnerable. Yes, you also help protect the illegal and the immoral, but there is no way to protect those who need it — those whom we are morally obligated to protect — without offering covering for those who abuse it.

Schneier on Security: Fake Cell Phone Towers Across the US

Schneier on Security: Fake Cell Phone Towers Across the US.

We have one infrastructure. We can’t choose a world where the US gets to spy and the Chinese don’t. We get to choose a world where everyone can spy, or a world where no one can spy. We can be secure from everyone, or vulnerable to anyone. And I’m tired of us choosing surveillance over security.

Green. Kills.

Why birds are igniting in midair over Calif.

Wildlife experts say that at least 1,000 and as many as 28,000 birds will die within a year, and Grist reports that the plant has had problems with tortoises as well — scores of them were uprooted from their homes when the plant was constructed, Businessweek reported in 2012.

Michael Munger on the Sharing Economy – EconTalk

Description:
Mike Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the sharing economy–companies like Uber, AirBnB, FlightApp, and DogVacay that let people share their houses, cars, or other assets with strangers in exchange for money. These companies dramatically increase the use of resources that would otherwise be idle and disrupt existing services such as hotels and taxis. Topics discussed include the regulatory response to these companies, the politics of that response, and the significance of these new products. The conversation closes with the potential impact of Uber combining with driverless cars to change the automobile industry and cities.

original source:
http://files.libertyfund.org/econtalk/y2014/Mungersharing.mp3

Michael Munger on the Sharing Economy – EconTalk

Description:
Mike Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the sharing economy–companies like Uber, AirBnB, FlightApp, and DogVacay that let people share their houses, cars, or other assets with strangers in exchange for money. These companies dramatically increase the use of resources that would otherwise be idle and disrupt existing services such as hotels and taxis. Topics discussed include the regulatory response to these companies, the politics of that response, and the significance of these new products. The conversation closes with the potential impact of Uber combining with driverless cars to change the automobile industry and cities.

original source:
http://files.libertyfund.org/econtalk/y2014/Mungersharing.mp3

Gregory Zuckerman on the Frackers and the Energy Revolution – EconTalk

Description:
Gregory Zuckerman of the Wall Street Journal and author of The Frackers: The Outrageous Inside Story of the New Billionaire Wildcatters, talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, the rise of hydraulic fracturing (fracking), how this technology developed, and the vibrant personalities that pioneered the energy revolution. Topics discussed along the way include the history and future of fracking, environmental concerns about the process, and how the story of fracking is the classic tale of the successes and failures of determined risk-takers. The role of market forces in driving that success and failure runs through the entire conversation.

original source:
http://files.libertyfund.org/econtalk/y2014/Zuckermanfracking.mp3

William Easterly on the Tyranny of Experts – EconTalk

Description:
William Easterly of New York University and author of The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in his book. Easterly argues that poverty endures in many poor countries because of a lack of economic and political freedom for its poorest members. He argues that the aid process and the role experts play in that process reinforces the oppression of the poor. Other topics discussed include data-oriented solutions, autocracy vs. democracy, and Easterly’s perspective on development from Bill Gates and recent EconTalk guest Jeffery Sachs.

original source:
http://files.libertyfund.org/econtalk/y2014/Easterlytyranny.mp3

Gavin Andresen on the Present and Future of Bitcoin – EconTalk

Gavin Andresen, Chief Scientist of the Bitcoin Foundation, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about where Bitcoin has been and where it might be headed in the future. Topics discussed include competing cryptocurrencies such as Dogecoin, the role of the Bitcoin Foundation, the challenges Bitcoin faces going forward, and the mystery of Satoshi Nakamoto.

source:
http://files.libertyfund.org/econtalk/y2014/Andresenfuturebitcoin.mp3